Louis Comfort

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Jim and I snuck in a fast trip into the Cincinnati Museum of Art this past weekend. We were in a hurry because I had a wedding too shoot starting in the mid afternoon and there was a lot of windshield time in-between. The excuse was to see a collection of Samurai weapons and armor that was closing the next day. However, it was a side gallery that proved to be the highlight to the outing for me. A collection of Tiffany windows and lamps.

Gorgeous subtle colors. See for yourself.

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Jason Morgan

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Jason Morgan is a local painter who is know for his portraits and hyper realistic still life paintings. His work has been showing at the Art Museum in Springfield, OH since mid summer and I saw him soon after the exhibition opened (You can see his work in the background of the photo). Over the weekend, I had some spare time and decided to take an hour and see if there was anything new at the museum. I was surprised to see Jason painting in the middle of the exhibit while answering questions from the gallery visitors. I’d say that was pretty good planning (pure luck) on my part.

As a non-painter, I was really interested to hear about the process of painting as well as what inspires him.the entire experience left me better educated as well as in a position to better understand his work. My hat is off to the folks on the museum staff that arranged for Jason to paint live and answer questions.

If you are in the central Ohio area, give the museum a visit. I think you’ll agree it’s time well spent. You can find out more about the museum here.

 

Surprises that Are Wonderful

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Don’t you love a great surprise? I do, and that is exactly what I got from seeing Kitchen V: Carrying the Milk, by Marina Abramovic.

When I first entered the gallery at Detroit’s Institute of the Arts, I saw the art from across the room and immediately crossed the room to look at it closer. I thought it was a backlit photo and wanted to read about it. As I neared, the work, I noticed that the woman’s hands were trembling and milk was spilling out of the bowl and and onto her dress and the floor. I was shocked. The piece was a video playing on a loupe. I had caught it towards the end and sat to watch it through from beginning to end. Abramovic’s work was wonderful and fantastic. Representing the female characteristics of endurance and nourishment. The stillness of the woman (Abramovic) added power to the performance. Simple, powerful, surprising, and innovative. I watched it three times before I was sated and ready to move on.

Portals

Portal

The transition from one space to another is a tricky one. You want to draw people out the old space and want them to enter the new space. But, how do you want them to experience the transition from one area to another? Do you want it to be a smooth subtle transition, as though you are leading them from one spot on a path to another? Do you want them to be jolted into a new reality? lure them from darkness to light? From grey to color?

Portals are tricky and you have to understand your purpose while placing yourself in the mind of the visitor. Good portals work. Others don’t. This one worked rather well.

Have a great day folks. I hope your Sunday becomes a pleasant transition to the rest of the week.

Art Is Not Free!

Art is Not Free

I am always amazed by the number of free art museums in Ohio. I am also awed by the massive building wrapping murals that pepper downtown Cincinnati. Arts festivals abound with lots of free music and booths filled with art. It is all free for the viewing. But, we all know that somebody has to pay for it. Time, materials, space…they all cost money. The artist is trying to make a living. The people putting up the tent and the lighting or the power all need to be paid. Museums still need to pay employees and their utilities. It’s never free.

Sometimes the museum is endowed or sponsored by a large corporation or other benefactor. Sometimes the city foots the bill for a festival. My point is that everyone is getting paid, even if it doesn’t come out of your pocket.

So, why am I regularly approached by websites for the right to use my images for free? My time, my years of experience, and my expensive equipment all have value. Why are you not willing to pay for them? “We will give you free exposure.” That is a load of crap. Your free exposure is free because it is worthless. I don’t know you from Adam. So, don’t expect to get the fruits of my investment in time, energy, and hard work for free.

And while I am on the subject. Make that suggested donation when you visit a free museum. Work to have your community support the Arts because your life will be all the more rich. It is an investment in the quality and value of your life and your community.

Friends and family? You still get free photos from me. Because you support me in many ways that provide me with the encouragement and motivation to keep shooting. And, I really like you guys.

Tim